Community and social participation

Community and social participation

Discrimination directly affects a person’s participation and inclusion in everyday activities. It can lead to people avoiding everyday activities, such as attending events or seeking medical help, or going to school or work.

This, in turn, increases the risk that people with disability will experience social isolation, which can affect their overall health and wellbeing.  Social isolation is where a person has minimal contact with others. It differs from loneliness, which is a negative feeling or emotion a person has about their lack of contact or connection to the world around them.

  • 1 in 3 (32%) people aged 15 and over with disability have avoided situations because of their disability. This includes:
  • visiting family or friends (40%), and 44% of people with severe or profound disability
  • going to shops and banks (33%), and 42.3% of people with severe or profound disability
  • going to restaurants/cafes/bars (30%), and 37% of people with severe or profound disability
  • using public transport (25%) and 38% of people with severe or profound disability
  • work (24%)
  • using public parks or recreation venues (19%)
  • Going to park or recreation venue (19%)
  • Using medical facilities (GP, Dentist, hospital) (10.8%)
  • Going to school or university (8%)

People with psychosocial disability are the most likely disability group to avoid situations because of their disability.

  • 65% aged 15 and over avoided situations in the last year, compared with 25% with other disability (ABS 2016).

 

View the full report “People with disability in Australia” by AIHW https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/disability/people-with-disability-in-australia/summary  

Sources: Except where stated otherwise, data is taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) 2016 via the AIHW Report 2019: Australians with Disability.  [1] VicDeaf.  [2] Price Waterhouse Coopers, 2011 ‘Disability expectations – investing in a better life, a strong Australia.’  [3] https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/aur.2016.  [4] Autism Aspergers Advocacy Australia (A4)